The Sydney Morning Herald, 19 april 1920
Bron: National Library of Australia

Supreme Council

TURKISH TREATY

LONDON, April 17.

Monday's Inter-Allied Conference at San Remo is arousing the keenest interest.

Paris messages state that the British have drafted a stern Note to Germany demanding disarmament. Possibly it will take the form of an ultimatum to be despatched after the conference. It is understood that the draft is intended to form the basis of discussions at San Remo. The newspapers regard the fact of the British initiating the discussion as intended to mark the end of Franco-British differences over the Ruhr episode. It is believed that Mr. Churchill, after a recent conference with Marshal Foch and General Weigand, drew up the document.

Although the situation in Germany dominates the work of the San Remo Conference, the Turkish Treaty will be dealt with, involving the important decision of the future of Armenia. It is authoritatively stated that, whatever the Supreme Council's reply may be to the League's objections to accepting a mandate, Turkey will not retain suzerainty over Armenia.

The Paris "Matin" foreshadows that the treaty will cause Turkey to lose half her inhabitants, only 9,000,000 Mohammedans and 2,000,000 Christians remaining under the Turkish flag. About 10,000,000 Arabs, Armenians, and Greeks will be liberated. Lesser Turkey, as the new State will be called, will be closely watched by the Allies. The constitution and army will be such as to prevent future trouble. Palestine, Syria, Arabia, and Mesopotamia will also be taken from Turkey. Whether the Ottoman Government remains at Constantinople or not, the city will be placed on an international footing. Armenia will become a new State.

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